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  • Euro coins and banknotes were introduced on 1 January 2002 in twelve countries. Today, the euro area has grown to include 18 countries. Euro coins feature a common design on one side. Also, the national side (reverse) of every coin includes a ring of 12 stars from the European Union flag. Each country has its own design for the national side of its coins.

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    to the details page of the euro coins
  • Austria introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Austrian schilling, which was the national currency from 1925 to 1938 and again from 1945.

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    to the details page of the austrian euro coins
  • Belgium introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Belgian franc, the currency since 1832.

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    to the details page of the belgian euro coins
  • Cyprus introduced the euro on 1 January 2008. It replaced the Cyprus pound, introduced as official currency in 1878 and for many years of equal value to the pound sterling.

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    to the details page of the cypriot euro coins
  • Estonia introduced the euro on 1 January 2011. The euro replaced the Estonian kroon, Estonia’s official currency between 1928 and 1940 and again from 1992.

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    to the details page of the estonian euro coins
  • Finland introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. Previously, the Finnish markka was used.

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    to the details page of the finnish euro coins
  • France introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the franc, which had been the official currency since 1795.

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    to the details page of the french euro coins
  • Germany introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Deutsche Mark, which became the official currency of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1948.

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    to the details page of the german euro coins
  • Greece introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Greek drachma, the official currency of Greece from 1832.

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    to the details page of the greek euro coins
  • Ireland introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Irish pound.

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    to the details page of the irish euro coins
  • Italy introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Italian lira, the official currency since the founding of the Kingdom of Italy in 1861.

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    to the details page of the italian euro coins
  • Lithuania introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2015. The euro replaced the Litas, which was the national currency from 1922 to 1941 and again from 1993.

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    to the details page of the lithuanian euro coins
  • Latvia introduced the euro on 1 January 2014. Between 1922 and 1940 and after 1992, the Latvian currency was the lats.

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    to the details page of the latvian euro coins
  • Luxembourg introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Luxembourg franc (known as ‘Franken’ in German and ‘Frang’ in Luxembourgish), the official currency since 1918.

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    to the details page of luxembourg’s euro coins
  • Malta introduced the euro on 1 January 2008. Until 31 December 2007, the country’s currency was the Maltese lira.

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    to the details page of the maltese euro coins
  • The Netherlands introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the guilder as the official currency. Guilders were first minted in Holland in the 14th century.

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    to the details page of the dutch euro coins
  • Slovakia introduced the euro on 1 January 2009.

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    to the details page of the slovak euro coins
  • Portugal introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. The euro replaced the Portuguese escudo, the official currency since 1914.

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    to the details page of the portuguese euro coins
  • Slovenia introduced the euro on 1 January 2007. The Slovenian tolar was introduced as the country’s official currency in October 1991, Following Slovenia’s independence.

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    to the details page of the slovenian euro coins
  • Spain introduced euro coins and banknotes on 1 January 2002. Until that date, the official currency was the Spanish peseta, introduced in 1869.

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    to the details page of the spanish euro coins

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